Jacobin - February 1, 2021

While racism and patriarchy are fundamental to fascist thinking, the fascist obsession with socialism is just as central. Every far-right movement in history has viewed socialism as its key adversary, and this one is no exception

It’s never reassuring to begin the New Year with a right-wing insurrection against an elected government. Much was disturbing about the January 6 Capitol riot, including the possibility of more antidemocratic, white supremacist mayhem yet to come. But especially terrifying were the threats on Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s life, and the news that the democratic socialist congresswoman may have come close to assassination.

Describing the events of January 6, AOC said on Instagram, “I can tell you that I had a very close encounter where I thought I was going to die.” She said that she couldn’t say much more about it for security reasons, but elaborated, “I did not know whether I was going to make it to the end of that day alive. Not just in a general sense, but in a very, very specific sense.”

The far right has been obsessed with AOC since her election in 2018. Its scary fixation on her reflects its terror of women and people of color holding power, of course, but these hard-rightists are also — as fascists always have been — deeply triggered by socialism.

A man from Texas was arrested after participating in the riots and calling for AOC’s assassination online. He now faces five federal charges. It’s good that the government is taking action against these dangerous criminals. But the more powerful actors freely walking into the Capitol every day may be even more dangerous. AOC said on Instagram that she did not feel safe in the place other members of Congress were hiding during the January 6 riot, because some of them were white supremacists and QAnon sympathizers, she said, “who I have felt would disclose my location and would create opportunities for me to be hurt, kidnapped, etc.” AOC rightly skipped Biden’s inauguration, both to join the picket line of striking workers in the Bronx, and also, she said, to avoid the security risk of being near those colleagues. ...
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