Truthout - October 9, 2020

Meanwhile, people are going hungry across the country, including millions of families and children. In September, between 7 and 11 million households reported that their children did not get enough to eat in the last seven days, according to the Census estimates. More than 40 percent of children live in a household that doesn’t have enough to eat or is behind on rent. Black and Latinx renters are twice as likely to report having trouble paying rent than white renters.

mily Brockman is a recently unemployed mother, but that didn’t stop her landlord from attempting to kick Brockman and her 5-month-old child out of their home in Lexington, Kentucky. Like millions of people across the United States, Brockman is struggling to pay rent and bills as talks over pandemic relief stall on Capitol Hill and stimulus checks fail to reach society’s most vulnerable. Despite a “moratorium” on evictions put in place by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) last month, Brockman was recently in court fighting for a place to live.

“[The judge] just looked at my landlord and said, ‘What would you like to do?’” Brockman said in a statement on Tuesday. “Of course, they said they would like to move forward with the eviction, and he said ‘OK.’ Everything happened so fast. I was shocked. I had assumed I was going to be safe under the CDC guidelines because I matched perfectly.”

Advocates say flaws in the CDC’s eviction order is just one of many massive holes in the federal safety net for people suffering under the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and with lawmakers still debating a stimulus relief package, policies put in place by the Trump administration are only making the suffering worse. Millions of low-income and incarcerated people have yet to receive the $1,200 stimulus payment Congress approved in the spring, and millions more remain out of work as federal unemployment benefits run dry. Nationally, about one in three adults — nearly 78 million people — are struggling to pay expenses such as rent, mortgage payments, medical bills and student loans. 

Read full report at Truthout